Jamie Peterson

3 Free Wolfram U Webinars Showcasing Innovative Data Science Applications

January 16, 2020 —Jamie Peterson, Technical Programs Manager, Wolfram U

Wolfram Technology in Action

Looking to fulfill your New Year’s resolution of learning new data science skills? Join Wolfram U for Wolfram Technology in Action: Data Science, a three-part web series demonstrating a range of data science applications in the Wolfram Language. These 90-minute sessions feature recorded talks from the 2019 Wolfram Technology Conference, along with live presentations by Wolfram staff scientists, application developers, software engineers and Wolfram Language users who apply the technology every day to their business operations and research.

Newcomers to Wolfram technology are welcome, as are longtime users wanting to see the latest functionality in the language.

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Jeffrey Bryant

Fire in the Hole! Exploring the Yellowstone Calderas with GeoGraphics and USGS Data

January 14, 2020 —Jeffrey Bryant, Research Programmer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Fire in the Hole! Exploring the Yellowstone Calderas with GeoGraphics and USGS Data

Yellowstone National Park has long been known for its active geysers. These geysers are a surface indication of subterranean volcanic activity in the park. In fact, Yellowstone is actually the location of the Yellowstone Caldera, a supervolcano: a volcano with an exceptionally large magma reservoir. The park has had a history of many explosive eruptions over the last two million years or so.

I’ve found that the United States Geological Survey (USGS) maintains data on the various volcanic calderas and related features, which makes it perfect for computational exploration with the Wolfram Language. This data is in the form of SHP files and related data stored as a ZIP archive. Thanks to the detail of this available data, we can use the Wolfram Language and, in particular, GeoGraphics to get a better picture of what this data is telling us.

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George Beck

An Intriguing Identity: Connecting Distinct and Complete Integer Partitions

January 9, 2020 —George Beck, Document & Media Systems

Number theory is a very old subject that in modern times has branched into various large areas. One of these is additive number theory, with problems like this: when is a prime the sum of two squares? Primes are part of the more classical area now called multiplicative number theory, so as this problem of Fermat’s indicates, the two areas are intimately connected. The problem I discuss in this blog is a mix of additive and multiplicative number theory, with a dash of linear algebra.

An Intriguing Identity: Connecting Distinct and Complete Integer Partitions

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Posted in: Mathematics

Tom Sherlock

Star Light, Star Bright: Stellar Aperture Photometry with the Wolfram Language

January 3, 2020 —Tom Sherlock, User Interface Developer, User Interfaces

Stellar CCD aperture photometry is the technique of extracting information about the brightness of stars from a series of images collected over time. The light curve of a variable star can reveal useful information about the physics of the star, including a measure of its intrinsic brightness. Light curve analysis can yield information about eclipsing binary systems, and also lead to exoplanet discoveries when a planet alters the brightness of a star by crossing its disk as viewed from Earth.

In CCD photometry, we want to be able to determine a measure of the amount of radiation coming from a given star arriving on our CCD detector. Plotted as a function of time, this measurement can reveal important information about the star or star system.

Star Light, Star Bright--Stellar Aperture Photometry with the Wolfram Language

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Jon McLoone

Crafty Computation: Cross-Stitch Patterns with the Wolfram Language

December 23, 2019 —Jon McLoone, Director, Technical Communication & Strategy

For many of us, programming represents leisure time just as much as work. Here at Wolfram, we have an incredibly creative group with a wide variety of hobbies, on the screen and off—including textile arts like cross-stitch. So when my colleague Jay suggested that I create a cross-stitch program using the Wolfram Language, I replied with “Challenge accepted!” Jay was looking for a simple way to generate a cross-stitch pattern from a photograph—or really any image—with the colors corresponding to the DMC thread ID numbers. We both knew that the image-processing capabilities of the Wolfram Language would make this an easy task, but incorporating the DMC thread catalog seemed a more interesting challenge. Armed with both computer and (virtual) thread, I set out on my quest to create the perfect cross-stitch pattern generator.

Crafty Computation: Cross-Stitch Patterns with the Wolfram Language

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Daniel Bigham

We’re Building Our Own ERP System: Ten Game-Changing Insights We Discovered along the Way

December 18, 2019 —Daniel Bigham, Business Systems R&D

When people think about Wolfram technology, corporate enterprise resource management (ERP) isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. It certainly wasn’t our first thought when we started searching for a new solution to manage our own accounting, customer service, licensing and HR needs. But after looking at the current ERP offerings, we found that none of the existing buy-in options did what we wanted.

So we thought, why not build our own?

The resulting project has been a revelation. Not only have we built something to our taste, but something fundamentally different: a new architecture, new interfaces, a new approach. Using Wolfram technology has not only made development easier; it has given us a revolutionary new perspective. By leveraging our uniquely powerful technology stack—and integrating it tightly with the existing infrastructure—we’re redefining what an ERP system can be.

 We’re Building Our Own ERP System

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Ishwarya Vardhani

From an Hour of Code to a Lifetime of Coding with the Wolfram Language

December 12, 2019 —Ishwarya Vardhani, Education Partnerships Manager, Partnerships

Happy Hour of Code! There’s no better reason to start learning or continue honing your programming skills than the Hour of Code, an annual celebration of computer science during Computer Science Education Week. While we like to think that every hour is a great hour to code, we look forward to the Hour of Code event as an opportunity to come together and share some of our best Wolfram Language resources for students. Since its 2013 launch, the Hour of Code has been an immense success, introducing valuable programming skills to millions of students. So with this year’s Hour already underway, let’s take a look at the ways you can get started!

From an Hour of Code to a Lifetime of Coding with the Wolfram Language

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Jon McLoone

Analyzing the Impact of Political Messages with the Wolfram Language

December 10, 2019 —Jon McLoone, Director, Technical Communication & Strategy

Much effort and money are spent trying to analyze whether political messages resonate with the electorate. With the UK in its final days before a general election, I thought I would see if I could gain such insight with minimal effort.

My approach is simple: track the sentiment of tweets that mention each party. Since the Wolfram Language has a built-in sentiment classifier and connections to external services, we can analyze these messages with only a few lines of code.

Analyzing the Impact of Political Messages with the Wolfram Language

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Christopher Carlson

The Winners of the 2019 One-Liner Competition

December 5, 2019 —Christopher Carlson, Senior User Interface Developer, User Interfaces

This year’s Wolfram Technology Conference was host to the eighth annual One-Liner Competition, an event where attendees show us the most astounding things they can accomplish with 128 or fewer characters of Wolfram Language code. Submissions included games, card tricks and yoga exercises, all implemented with less than one tweet’s worth of the Wolfram Language.

The Winners of the 2019 One-Liner Competition

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Jessica Wong

New Wolfram Books: Adventures, Lessons and Computations to Spark Your Curiosity

November 26, 2019 —Jessica Wong, Editorial Content Manager, Document and Media Systems

It’s been another big year of exploration with the Wolfram Language. CEO Stephen Wolfram’s new book takes us on a tour of his computational adventures throughout the years. We’re also excited to introduce a Spanish-language version of the popular An Elementary Introduction to the Wolfram Language, as well as books to enhance the mathematics and engineering curricula. There’s something new for everyone, from students to lifelong adventurers, to discover with the Wolfram Language. Just in time for the holidays, find the perfect read for those who love learning new things—including yourself!

Adventures of a Computational Explorer

Adventures of a Computational Explorer

Join Stephen Wolfram as he brings the reader along on some of his most surprising and engaging intellectual adventures, showcasing his own signature way of thinking about an impressive range of subjects. From science consulting for a Hollywood movie, solving problems of AI ethics, hunting for the source of an unusual polyhedron, communicating with extraterrestrials, to finding the fundamental theory of physics and exploring the digits of pi, this lively book of essays captures the infectious energy and curiosity of one of the great pioneers of the computational world.

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